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Retrovirology. 2019 Mar 7;16(1):6. doi: 10.1186/s12977-019-0468-z.

Origin and recent expansion of an endogenous gammaretroviral lineage in domestic and wild canids.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, 43403, USA. juliahw@bgsu.edu.
2
Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, 43403, USA.
4
Centre for Virus Research, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland, UK.
5
Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan Medical School, 100 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vertebrate genomes contain a record of retroviruses that invaded the germlines of ancestral hosts and are passed to offspring as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). ERVs can impact host function since they contain the necessary sequences for expression within the host. Dogs are an important system for the study of disease and evolution, yet no substantiated reports of infectious retroviruses in dogs exist. Here, we utilized Illumina whole genome sequence data to assess the origin and evolution of a recently active gammaretroviral lineage in domestic and wild canids.

RESULTS:

We identified numerous recently integrated loci of a canid-specific ERV-Fc sublineage within Canis, including 58 insertions that were absent from the reference assembly. Insertions were found throughout the dog genome including within and near gene models. By comparison of orthologous occupied sites, we characterized element prevalence across 332 genomes including all nine extant canid species, revealing evolutionary patterns of ERV-Fc segregation among species as well as subpopulations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sequence analysis revealed common disruptive mutations, suggesting a predominant form of ERV-Fc spread by trans complementation of defective proviruses. ERV-Fc activity included multiple circulating variants that infected canid ancestors from the last 20 million to within 1.6 million years, with recent bursts of germline invasion in the sublineage leading to wolves and dogs.

KEYWORDS:

Canidae; Canine; Endogenous retrovirus; Insertional polymorphism; Retrovirus

PMID:
30845962
DOI:
10.1186/s12977-019-0468-z
Free PMC Article

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