Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2019 Aug;53(8):760-771. doi: 10.1177/0004867419836031. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Altered social cognition and connectivity of default mode networks in the co-occurrence of autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Wang K1,2, Xu M2, Ji Y2, Zhang L1,2, Du X2, Li J3, Luo Q4,5,6, Li F2,7.

Author information

1
1 Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.
2
2 Developmental and Behavioral Pediatric Department & Child Primary Care Department, Brain and Behavioral Research Unit of Shanghai Institute for Pediatric Research and MOE Shanghai Key Laboratory for Children's Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.
3
3 Department of Integrative Medicine on Pediatrics, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.
4
4 Institute of Science and Technology for Brain-Inspired Intelligence, Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China.
5
5 Key Laboratory of Computational Neuroscience and Brain-Inspired Intelligence (Fudan University), Ministry of Education, P.R. China.
6
6 School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China.
7
7 Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

As two common neurodevelopmental disorders, autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder frequently occur together. Until now, only a few studies have investigated the co-occurrence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autistic spectrum disorder, this is due to restrictions associated with previous Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Most previous research has focused on the developmental trajectories for autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder separately, while the neural mechanisms underpinning the co-occurrence of autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder remain largely unknown.

METHODS:

We studied 162 autistic spectrum disorder individuals (including 79 co-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 83 non-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients) and 177 typical developing individuals using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange II, an aggregated magnetic resonance imaging dataset from 19 centers. Independent component analysis was used to extract sub-networks from the classic resting-state networks. Functional connectivity values within (intra-iFC) and between (inter-iFC) these networks were then determined. Subsequently, we compared the ASD_coADHD group with the ASD_nonADHD group in relation to the abnormal intra-iFC and inter-iFC of autistic spectrum disorder group relative to the typical developing group.

RESULTS:

The ASD_coADHD group showed more severe social impairment and decreased intra-iFC in the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex of the default mode network (independent component 17) and increased inter-iFC between the default mode network (independent component 8) and the somatomotor networks (independent component 2) compared to the ASD_nonADHD group. In addition, the strength of the intra-iFC in the default mode network was associated with the severity of autistic traits across the entire autistic spectrum disorder group and particularly the ASD_coADHD group.

CONCLUSION:

Our results showed that dysfunction of the default mode network is a central feature in the co-occurrence of autistic spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, including connectivity within the default mode network as well as between the default mode network and the somatomotor networks, thus supporting the existence of a clinically combined phenotype (autistic spectrum disorder + attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; co-occurrence; default mode network; resting-state fMRI

PMID:
30843728
DOI:
10.1177/0004867419836031

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center