Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bone. 2019 Mar 3;122:184-192. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2019.03.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Daily oligofructose-enriched inulin intake impacts bone turnover markers but not the cytokine profile in pediatric patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet: Results of a randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10 Str., 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address: n.drabinska@pan.olsztyn.pl.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition Collegium Medicum School of Medicine University of Warmia and Masuria, Żołnierska 18A Str., 10-561 Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address: ejarocka@o2.pl.
3
Department of Immunology and Food Microbiology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10 Str., 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address: d.zlotkowska@pan.olsztyn.pl.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Rheumatology, Immunology and Metabolic Bone Diseases, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland. Electronic address: pabram@o2.pl.
5
Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10 Str., 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address: u.krupa-kozak@pan.olsztyn.pl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bone metabolism disturbances are commonly observed in patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease (CD). The only available treatment for CD-the intake of a gluten-free diet (GFD)-has been found to be insufficient in effectively improving bone health in some patients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to modify the GFD so as to allow for the provision of all the necessary nutrients and improved absorption. Prebiotics intake reportedly improves the absorption of bone-related vitamin D and calcium as well as bone metabolism. The effect of prebiotic intake on bone health in CD patients has not been studied yet. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of oligofructose-enriched inulin intake on bone metabolism and immune response in children with CD on a GFD.

METHODS:

A total of 34 children with CD were randomised into two groups receiving 10 g of oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy 1) or a placebo (maltodextrin) for three months, together with a strict GFD. The children's bone metabolism marker levels and cytokine profiles were analysed before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

After supplementation, the concentration of osteocalcin increased significantly in children receiving Synergy 1, while the concentration of bone alkaline phosphatase increased in both groups, independent of supplementation. After the intervention, the level of pyridinoline increased significantly in the placebo group, resulting in a concentration that was two times higher than that in the Synergy 1 group, in which it remained stable. Moreover, the plasma concentrations of N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen decreased in both the groups, whereas the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b level increased particularly in the Synergy 1 group. The intervention did not lead to immunological response changes.

CONCLUSIONS:

The proposed supplementation beneficially altered bone metabolism, through increased bone formation rates and decreased bone resorption process rates. Supplementation of GFD with prebiotic oligofructose-enriched inulin may be a promising auxiliary therapy for bone metabolism improvements in children with CD.

KEYWORDS:

Bone turnover; Celiac disease; Cytokines; Gluten-free diet; Oligofructose-enriched inulin; Prebiotics

PMID:
30840918
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2019.03.001

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center