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J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2019 Mar 6;44(3):1-14. [Epub ahead of print]

The Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression (CAN-BIND): magnetic resonance imaging protocols

Author information

1
From the Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., Canada (MacQueen, Hassel, Addington, Sharma); the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Arnott, Zamyadi, Strother); the Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont., Canada (Bowie, Harkness, Milev); the Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., Canada (Bray, Lebel); the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Calgary, Alta., Canada (Bray, Lebel); the Child and Adolescent Imaging Research (CAIR) Program, Calgary, Alta., Canada (Bray, Lebel); the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ont., Canada (Hall); the Krembil Research Institute and Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Downar); the Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Downar); the Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Downar, Müller, Rizvi, Rotzinger, Kennedy); the Department of Psychiatry, Krembil Research Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Foster, Rotzinger, Kennedy); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ont., Canada (Foster, Frey); the Centre for Youth Bipolar Disorder, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Goldstein); the Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Goldstein); the Department of Computer Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., Canada (Harris); the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Authority, Vancouver, B.C., Canada (Lam, Vila-Rodriguez); the Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University and Providence Care Hospital, Kingston, Ont., Canada (Milev, Soares); the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Müller); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA (Parikh); the Arthur Sommer Rotenberg Suicide and Depression Studies Program, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Rizvi); the Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Rizvi); the Department of Psychiatry, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Rotzinger, Soares, Yu); McGill University, Montréal, Que., Canada (Turecki); the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Frank B. Common, Montréal, Que., Canada (Turecki); and the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Kennedy).

Abstract

Studies of clinical populations that combine MRI data generated at multiple sites are increasingly common. The Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression (CAN-BIND; www.canbind.ca) is a national depression research program that includes multimodal neuroimaging collected at several sites across Canada. The purpose of the current paper is to provide detailed information on the imaging protocols used in a number of CAN-BIND studies. The CAN-BIND program implemented a series of platform-specific MRI protocols, including a suite of prescribed structural and functional MRI sequences supported by real-time monitoring for adherence and quality control. The imaging data are retained in an established informatics and databasing platform. Approximately 1300 participants are being recruited, including almost 1000 with depression. These include participants treated with antidepressant medications, transcranial magnetic stimulation, cognitive behavioural therapy and cognitive remediation therapy. Our ability to analyze the large number of imaging variables available may be limited by the sample size of the substudies. The CAN-BIND program includes a multimodal imaging database supported by extensive clinical, demographic, neuropsychological and biological data from people with major depression. It is a resource for Canadian investigators who are interested in understanding whether aspects of neuroimaging — alone or in combination with other variables — can predict the outcomes of various treatment modalities.

PMID:
30840428
DOI:
10.1503/jpn.180036

Conflict of interest statement

G. MacQueen reports consultancy/speaker fees from Lundbeck, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Janssen, outside the submitted work. B. Frey reports grants and personal fees from Pfizer and personal fees from Sunovion, outside the submitted work. R. Milev reports grants, nonfinancial support and honoraria from Lundbeck, Janssen and Pfizer; personal fees and honoraria from Sunovion, Shire, Allergan and Otsuka; grants from Boehringer Ingelheim; and grants from the Ontario Brain Institute, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and CAN-BIND, outside the submitted work. F. Vila-Rodriguez reports nonfinancial support from Magventure during the conduct of the study; grants from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Brain Canada, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, and the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute; and personal fees from Janssen, outside the submitted work. S. Rizvi reports grants from Pfizer Canada, outside the submitted work. S. Strother reports grants from Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression during the conduct of the study and grants from Ontario Brain Institute, outside the submitted work. He is also the chief scientific officer of the neuroimaging data analysis company ADMdx, Inc (www. admdx.com), which specializes in brain image analysis to enable diagnosis, prognosis and drug effect detection for Alzheimer disease and various other forms of dementia. R. Lam reports grants from Canadian Institutes of Health Research during the conduct of the study; grants from Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, VGH-UBCH Foundation, BC LEading Edge Endowment Fund, Janssen, Lundbeck, Pfizer and St. Jude Medical, outside the submitted work; personal fees from Allergan, Akili, CME Institute, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, Janssen, Lundbeck, Lundbeck Institute, Pfizer, Otsuka, Medscape and Hansoh, outside the submitted work; travel expenses from Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation outside the submitted work; and stock options from Mind Mental Health Technologies.

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