Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Methods Mol Biol. 2019;1922:393-403. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-9012-2_35.

In Vivo Rodent Models for Studying Dental Caries and Pulp Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
2
Dept. of Prosthodontics, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Jiaotong, China.
3
College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
4
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
5
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
6
Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
7
Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
8
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Stomatology, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, China.
9
Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
10
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
11
Toxicology Interdisciplinary Program, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
12
Biomedical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
13
College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. petros.papagerakis@usask.ca.
14
School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. petros.papagerakis@usask.ca.

Abstract

Dental caries is an infectious oral disease caused primarily by complex interactions of cariogenic oral flora (biofilm) with dietary carbohydrates on the tooth surface over time. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus (S. mutans and S. sobrinus) are the most prevalent cariogenic species within the oral biofilm and considered the main etiological agents of caries. Pulp exposure and infection can be caused by trauma, carious lesion, and mechanical reasons. Pulp response to these exposures depends on the state of the pulp as well as the potential bacterial contamination of pulp tissue. Herein, we describe the process of using two in vivo rodent models to study the progression of dental caries and pulp disease: a nutritional microbial model and a pulp disease induction model. The progression of the carious lesion and pulpal infections in both models was assessed by micro-CT imaging and histomorphometric analysis. Moreover, the pulp disease induction models can be used to compare and assess the antibacterial and reparative properties of the different pulp capping materials.

KEYWORDS:

Caries; Pulp; Pulp capping; Streptococcus mutans; Streptococcus sobrinus

PMID:
30838593
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-9012-2_35
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center