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Arch Biochem Biophys. 1986 Apr;246(1):332-46.

Regulation of photorespiration in leaves: evidence that the fraction of ribulose bisphosphate oxygenated is conserved and stoichiometry fluctuates.

Abstract

Under steady-state conditions the combined system of the reductive photosynthetic cycle and the oxidative photorespiratory loop may be defined by two partitioning terms: the fraction of ribulose bisphosphate oxygenated and the fraction of glycolate carbon photorespired (the stoichiometry of photorespiration). A combination of physical and stereochemical methods [K.R. Hanson, and R. B. Peterson, (1985) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 237,300-310] has been used to estimate these partitionings for tobacco leaf discs. Inverted discs, as compared to normally oriented discs, were found to have greater net photosynthesis; their ratio of photorespiration to net photosynthesis was less, and less of their glycolate carbon was photorespired. An eightfold reduction of irradiance below that of full sunlight for inverted discs in normal air at 32 degrees C reduced both photosynthesis and photorespiration about threefold but had little effect on the partitioning of ribulose bisphosphate and glycolate. Increasing the temperature from 22 to 40 degrees C for inverted discs in normal air and 1000 microE m-2 s-1 irradiance had little effect on net photosynthesis but increased the ratio of photorespiration to net photosynthesis almost threefold; ribulose bisphosphate partitioning was little changed but the fraction of glycolate carbon photorespired more than doubled. If field-grown plants respond to temperature in a similar fashion, genetic intervention to reduce the increase in photorespiration stoichiometry with temperature could increase total daily carbon assimilation and hence improve crop yields.

PMID:
3083777
DOI:
10.1016/0003-9861(86)90478-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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