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Curr Med Chem. 2019 Feb 28. doi: 10.2174/0929867326666190228120908. [Epub ahead of print]

B7-H3-targeted radioimmunotherapy of human cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. United States.
2
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. United States.
3
Institute for Quantitative Health Science and Engineering, Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. United States.
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an attractive approach to selectively localize therapeutic radionuclides to malignant cells within primary and metastatic tumors while sparing normal tissues from the effects of radiation. Many human malignancies express B7-H3 on the tumor cell surface, while expression on the majority of normal tissues is limited, presenting B7-H3 as a candidate target for RIT. This review provides an overview of the general principles of targeted RIT and discusses publications that have used radiolabeled B7-H3-targeted antibodies for RIT of cancer in preclinical or clinical studies.

METHODS:

Databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched for publications through June 2018 using a combination of terms including "B7-H3", "radioimmunotherapy", "targeted", "radiotherapy", and "cancer." After screening search results for relevancy, ten publications were included for discussion.

RESULTS:

B7-H3-targeted RIT studies to date range from antibody development and assessment of novel radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) in animal models of human cancer to phase II/III trials in humans. The majority of clinical studies have used B7-H3-targeted RICs for intra-compartment RIT of central nervous system malignancies. The results of these studies have indicated high tolerability and favorable efficacy outcomes, supporting further assessment of B7-H3-targeted RIT in larger trials. Preclinical B7-H3-targeted RIT studies have also shown encouraging therapeutic outcomes in a variety of solid malignancies.

CONCLUSION:

B7-H3-targeted RIT studies over the last 15 years have demonstrated feasibility for clinical development and support future assessment in a broader array of human malignancies. Future directions worthy of exploration include strategies that combine B7-H3-targeted RIT with chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

KEYWORDS:

Targeted radioimmunotherapy; B7-H3; cancer; mAb

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