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Arch Womens Ment Health. 2019 Mar 4. doi: 10.1007/s00737-019-00956-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Mood instability during pregnancy and postpartum: a systematic review.

Author information

1
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, E-Wing, Room 4248, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada. hua.li@usask.ca.
2
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, E-Wing, Room 4246, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada.
3
College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Ellis Hall, RUH, Room 112, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0W8, Canada.
4
College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Ellis Hall, RUH, Room 104, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0W8, Canada.
5
School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, E-Wing, Room 3338, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada.
6
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, E-Wing, Room 4348, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada.
7
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, E-Wing, Room 3246, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada.

Abstract

Perinatal mood instability (MI) is a common clinical observation in perinatal women, and existing research indicates that MI is strongly associated with a variety of mental disorders. The purpose of this study is to review the evidence of perinatal MI systematically, with a focus on perinatal MI, its relation to perinatal depression, and its effects on children. A systematic search of the literature using PRISMA guidelines was conducted on seven academic health databases to identify any peer-reviewed articles published in English from 1985 to July 2017. Studies were screened, data were extracted, and quality of the selected studies was assessed. A total of 1927 abstracts were returned from the search, with 1063 remaining for abstract screening after duplicate removal, and 4 quantitative studies were selected for final analysis. The selected studies addressed perinatal MI (n = 2), the relation of perinatal MI to perinatal depression (n = 1), and the effects of perinatal MI on children (n = 1). The selected studies identified that perinatal women experienced a significantly higher level of MI than non-perinatal women, MI is a prominent feature in perinatal women with and without depression, mood lability during the early postpartum predicts psychopathology up to 14 months postpartum, and maternal emotion dysregulation, rather than maternal psychopathology, increases the risk of heightened facial affect synchrony in mother-infant interaction. The study reveals a significant gap in the literature of perinatal MI.

KEYWORDS:

Mood instability; Perinatal women; Postpartum; Pregnancy

PMID:
30834475
DOI:
10.1007/s00737-019-00956-6

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