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Heart Fail Clin. 2019 Apr;15(2):229-239. doi: 10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.003. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Resting and Exercise Doppler Hemodynamics: How and Why?

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, The Alfred, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Department of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: shane.nanayakkara@baker.edu.au.
2
Department of Cardiology, The Alfred, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Heart Failure Research Laboratory, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
3
Department of Cardiology, The Alfred, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.

Abstract

Exercise intolerance is the clinical hallmark of the failing heart. Evidence of hemodynamic derangement is not always present at rest, often necessitating dynamic challenges to accentuate abnormalities. Although cardiac catheterization, particularly with exercise, remains the gold standard method for hemodynamic assessment, it is limited by practicality, access, risk, and its invasive nature; consequently, there is a need to better understand noninvasive measures. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI offer promising modalities to quantify ventriculo-vascular interactions. Significant heterogeneity exists around exercise protocols, and there is a need to develop consensus methodology and to validate these noninvasive measures in all forms of heart failure.

KEYWORDS:

Diastole; Exercise; Heart failure; Invasive; Pressure; Pulmonary hypertension; Stress test; Valvular heart disease

PMID:
30832814
DOI:
10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.003

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