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BMC Endocr Disord. 2019 Mar 4;19(1):28. doi: 10.1186/s12902-019-0352-9.

Additive interaction of snoring and body mass index on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Chinese coal mine employees: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, 56 Xinjiannanlu Street, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Datong Coal Mining Group, Datong, China.
4
Department of Urology, General Hospital of Datong Coal Mining Group, Datong, China.
5
Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, 56 Xinjiannanlu Street, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China. tongwang@sxmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although snoring has been previously reported to be associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), its interaction with body mass index(BMI) on MetS remains unclear. We aimed to examine the individual effects and possible interaction between snoring and BMI on MetS.

METHODS:

From July 2013 to December 2013, 3794 employees of coal mining enterprises aged 18 to 65 were recruited from Shanxi province of China. The individual effects were assessed by multivariable logistic regression model. Additive interaction was evaluated by calculating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI), attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) and synergy index(S).

RESULTS:

We found that, after adjusting for potential confounders, odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI for MetS was 1.30 (1.09, 1.56) in occasional snorers and 1.50 (1.24, 1.82) in habitual snorers compared with non-snorers. BMI ≥ 24 was related to high risk of MetS (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.93-3.63). Significant additive interaction between snoring and BMI on MetS was detected. The estimates and 95% CI of the RERI, AP and S were 1.89 (0.67, 3.24), 0.23 (0.08, 0.38), and 1.37 (1.11, 1.75), respectively. However, stratified by workplace, the additive interaction was only significant among underground front-line and ground workers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both Snoring and BMI were related to high risk of Mets. Moreover, there are additive interaction between snoring and BMI. Snorers who worked underground front-line and ground are more susceptible to the negative impact of being overweight on MetS.

KEYWORDS:

Additive interaction; BMI; MetS; Snoring; Workplace

PMID:
30832625
PMCID:
PMC6399959
DOI:
10.1186/s12902-019-0352-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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