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Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Mar 1;109(3):597-605. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqy313.

Use of dietary supplements containing soy isoflavones and breast cancer risk among women aged >50 y: a prospective study.

Author information

1
Léon Bérard Cancer Center, UNICANCER, Lyon, France.
2
Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, French Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) 1052, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) 5286, Lyon, France.
3
Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), "Health across Generations" team, INSERM U1018, Villejuif, France.
4
CESP, University of Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France.
5
Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France, Neurocentre Magendie, Bordeaux, France.
6
University of Bordeaux, Physiopathologie de la plasticité neuronale, INSERM U1215, Neurocentre Magendie, Bordeaux, France.
7
Breast and Gynaecologic Cancer Registry of Cote d'Or, Georges-Francois Leclerc Cancer Centre, UNICANCER, Dijon, France.
8
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) de Rennes, University of Rennes 1, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Nutrition, Rennes, France.
9
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, Lyon, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Soy-based dietary supplements have been promoted as natural alternatives to menopausal hormone therapy, but their potential effect on breast cancer development is controversial.

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the relation between the consumption of soy supplements and the risk of breast cancer, overall and by tumor hormone receptor status, among women aged >50 y.

METHODS:

In total, 76,442 women from the Etude Epidemiologique aupres de Femmes de la Mutuelle Generale de l'Education Nationale (E3N) cohort, born between 1925 and 1950, were followed from 2000 to 2011 (11.2 y on average, starting at a mean age of 59.5 y; 3608 incident breast cancers), with soy supplement use assessed every 2-3 y. HRs of breast cancer were estimated with the use of multivariable Cox models.

RESULTS:

Compared with never using soy supplements, the HRs associated with current use of soy supplements were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.11) for all, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.99) for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, and 2.01 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.86) for ER-negative breast cancers. There was no association between past use of soy supplements and breast cancer. HRs for current use were 1.36 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.93) and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.02) among women with and without a family history of breast cancer, respectively (P-interaction = 0.03) and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.30) ≥5 y after menopause compared with 0.50 (95% CI: 0.31, 0.81) in premenopause or ≤5 y postmenopause (P-interaction = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this cohort of women aged >50 y, we report opposing associations of soy supplements with ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer risk. Our results also caution against the use of these supplements in women with a family history of breast cancer. Whether the risk profile of soy supplements could be more favorable among premenopausal or recently postmenopausal women deserves further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer; cohort; dietary supplements; hormone receptors; isoflavones; prospective study; soy; women aged over 50 years

PMID:
30831601
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/nqy313
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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