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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2019 Dec;61(12):1362-1367. doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14187. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Early intervention programmes for infants at high risk of atypical neurodevelopmental outcome.

Author information

1
Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
2
Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
3
Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.
4
School of Health Sciences, Centre for Maternal and Child Health, University of London, London, UK.
5
Department of Physiotherapy, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK.
6
Neonatal Neuroscience, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
7
Bobath Children's Therapy Centre, Cardiff, UK.
8
Homerton University Hospital, London, UK.
9
Speech and Language Therapy Team, Hackney and the City Integrated Trust, London, UK.
10
School of Medicine, Keele University, Keele, UK.
11
Child and Adolescent Mental (CAMHS) Disability Service, Homerton University Hospital, London, UK.
12
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
13
Department of Paediatric Neurology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

in English, Portuguese, Spanish

The purpose of this review is to present a new framework, EI SMART (early intervention: sensorimotor development, attention and regulation, relationships, and therapist support) for identifying key components that could contribute to more effective interventions for infants at high risk of atypical neurodevelopmental outcome. We present a clinical consensus of current challenges and themes in early intervention, based on multidisciplinary group discussions, including parents of high-risk infants, supported by a literature review. Components to include in early intervention programmes are: (1) promotion of self-initiated, developmentally appropriate motor activity; (2) supporting infant self-regulation and the development of positive parent-infant relationships; and (3) promotion of early communication skills, parent coaching, responsive parenting, and supporting parental mental well-being. Such multimodal programmes may need to be evaluated as a package. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: Early intervention programmes should address sensorimotor development, attention, self-regulation, and early communication skills. Therapist input to the programme should include parent coaching and support for parental mental well-being.

PMID:
30828797
DOI:
10.1111/dmcn.14187

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