Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chromosoma. 2019 Mar 2. doi: 10.1007/s00412-019-00692-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Leagues of their own: sexually dimorphic features of meiotic prophase I.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Biology, Department of Biology, University of Oregon, 1370 Franklin Boulevard, Eugene, OR, 97403-1229, USA.
2
Institute of Molecular Biology, Department of Biology, University of Oregon, 1370 Franklin Boulevard, Eugene, OR, 97403-1229, USA. dlibuda@uoregon.edu.

Abstract

Meiosis is a conserved cell division process that is used by sexually reproducing organisms to generate haploid gametes. Males and females produce different end products of meiosis: eggs (females) and sperm (males). In addition, these unique end products demonstrate sex-specific differences that occur throughout meiosis to produce the final genetic material that is packaged into distinct gametes with unique extracellular morphologies and nuclear sizes. These sexually dimorphic features of meiosis include the meiotic chromosome architecture, in which both the lengths of the chromosomes and the requirement for specific meiotic axis proteins being different between the sexes. Moreover, these changes likely cause sex-specific changes in the recombination landscape with the sex that has the longer chromosomes usually obtaining more crossovers. Additionally, epigenetic regulation of meiosis may contribute to sexually dimorphic recombination landscapes. Here we explore the sexually dimorphic features of both the chromosome axis and crossing over for each stage of meiotic prophase I in Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we consider how sex-specific changes in the meiotic chromosome axes and the epigenetic landscape may function together to regulate crossing over in each sex, indicating that the mechanisms controlling crossing over may be different in oogenesis and spermatogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

Chromosome architecture; Chromosome axis; Crossing over; Crossover; Gametogenesis; Germ cell development; Meiosis; Oogenesis; Recombination; Sex-specific differences; Sexual dimorphism; Spermatogenesis; Synaptonemal complex

PMID:
30826870
DOI:
10.1007/s00412-019-00692-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center