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Behav Brain Res. 2019 Jun 3;365:26-35. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2019.02.044. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Effects of chronic mild stress induced depression on synaptic plasticity in mouse hippocampus.

Author information

1
College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi, China.
2
College of Chemistry & Pharmacy, Northwest A&F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology (Incubation) and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Food Biological Safety Control, Shenzhen Research Institute of Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen 518057, China.
4
College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi, China. Electronic address: YongHuang@nwsuaf.edu.cn.
5
College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi, China. Electronic address: shantingzhao@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Chronic mild stress (CMS) model is most similar to the depression human suffered in daily life. Strong evidence proved the important role of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the mechanism of depression. This study investigated the effect of CMS on synaptic plasticity in hippocampus. Our results showed that CMS impaired spatial memory and exploring ability, disturbed the release of neurotransmitters including 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), reduced the density of synaptic vesicle in inner molecular layer, increased the number of thin spines in inner and outer molecular layer, whereas did not affect the density of spine apparatus, the above mentioned were probably related to the reduction of astrocytes and activation of microglial cells.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic mild stress; Molecular layer; Spine; Synapse; Synaptic plasticity

PMID:
30825464
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2019.02.044

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