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Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 1;9(1):3307. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-39498-3.

Metabolic effects of leptin receptor knockdown or reconstitution in adipose tissues.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
3
Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. tim.kieffer@ubc.ca.
4
Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. tim.kieffer@ubc.ca.

Abstract

The relative contribution of peripheral and central leptin signalling to the regulation of metabolism and the mechanisms through which leptin affects glucose homeostasis have not been fully elucidated. We generated complementary lines of mice with either leptin receptor (Lepr) knockdown or reconstitution in adipose tissues using Cre-lox methodology. Lepr knockdown mice were modestly lighter and had lower plasma insulin concentrations following an oral glucose challenge compared to controls, despite similar insulin sensitivity. We rendered male mice diabetic using streptozotocin (STZ) and found that upon prolonged leptin therapy, Lepr knockdown mice had an accelerated decrease in blood glucose compared to controls that was associated with higher plasma concentrations of leptin and leptin receptor. Mice with transcriptional blockade of Lepr (LeprloxTB/loxTB) were obese and hyperglycemic and reconstitution of Lepr in adipose tissues of LeprloxTB/loxTB mice resulted in males reaching a higher maximal body weight. Although mice with adipose tissue Lepr reconstitution had lower blood glucose levels at several ages, their plasma insulin concentrations during an oral glucose test were elevated. Thus, attenuation or restoration of Lepr in adipocytes alters the plasma insulin profile following glucose ingestion, modifies the glucose-lowering effect of prolonged leptin therapy in insulin-deficient diabetes, and may modulate weight gain.

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