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Int J Mol Sci. 2019 Mar 1;20(5). pii: E1060. doi: 10.3390/ijms20051060.

Histone Acetylation of Immune Regulatory Genes in Human Placenta in Association with Maternal Intake of Olive Oil and Fish Consumption.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, and Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, 11883 Stockholm, Sweden. nacevedoc@unicartagena.edu.co.
2
Institute for Immunological Research, University of Cartagena, Cartagena 130015, Colombia. nacevedoc@unicartagena.edu.co.
3
Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden. paolo.frumento@ki.se.
4
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center (UGMLC), and the inVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Philipps-University Marburg, 35043 Marburg, Germany. hani.harb@childrens.harvard.edu.
5
Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. hani.harb@childrens.harvard.edu.
6
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center (UGMLC), and the inVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Philipps-University Marburg, 35043 Marburg, Germany. alashkab@staff.uni-marburg.de.
7
College of Pharmacy, International University for Science and Technology (IUST), Daraa 15, Syria. alashkab@staff.uni-marburg.de.
8
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, and Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, 11883 Stockholm, Sweden. catharina.johansson@ki.se.
9
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center (UGMLC), and the inVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Philipps-University Marburg, 35043 Marburg, Germany. lisaeick@t-online.de.
10
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, and Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, 11883 Stockholm, Sweden. johan.alm@ki.se.
11
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center (UGMLC), and the inVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Philipps-University Marburg, 35043 Marburg, Germany. harald.renz@uk-gm.de.
12
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, and Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, 11883 Stockholm, Sweden. annika.scheynius@ki.se.
13
Clinical Genomics, Science for Life Laboratory, 17165 Stockholm, Sweden. annika.scheynius@ki.se.
14
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center (UGMLC), and the inVIVO Planetary Health, Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Philipps-University Marburg, 35043 Marburg, Germany. potaczek@staff.uni-marburg.de.
15
John Paul II Hospital, 31-202 Krakow, Poland. potaczek@staff.uni-marburg.de.

Abstract

Maternal diet modifies epigenetic programming in offspring, a potentially critical factor in the immune dysregulation of modern societies. We previously found that prenatal fish oil supplementation affects neonatal T-cell histone acetylation of genes implicated in adaptive immunity including PRKCZ, IL13, and TBX21. In this study, we measured H3 and H4 histone acetylation levels by chromatin immunoprecipitation in 173 term placentas collected in the prospective birth cohort, ALADDIN, in which information on lifestyle and diet is thoroughly recorded. In anthroposophic families, regular olive oil usage during pregnancy was associated with increased H3 acetylation at FOXP3 (p = 0.004), IL10RA (p = 0.008), and IL7R (p = 0.007) promoters, which remained significant after adjustment by offspring gender. Furthermore, maternal fish consumption was associated with increased H4 acetylation at the CD14 gene in placentas of female offspring (p = 0.009). In conclusion, prenatal olive oil intake can affect placental histone acetylation in immune regulatory genes, confirming previously observed pro-acetylation effects of olive oil polyphenols. The association with fish consumption may implicate ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids present in fish oil. Altered histone acetylation in placentas from mothers who regularly include fish or olive oil in their diets could influence immune priming in the newborn.

KEYWORDS:

ALADDIN; H3; H4; fish; histone acetylation; immune genes; maternal diet; olive oil; placenta; pregnancy

PMID:
30823645
DOI:
10.3390/ijms20051060
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