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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Feb 25;16(4). pii: E674. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16040674.

The Moderating Role of Self-Control and Financial Strain in the Relation between Exposure to the Food Environment and Obesity: The GLOBE Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1007 MB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. j.mackenbach@vumc.nl.
2
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.beenackers@erasmusmc.nl.
3
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. j.m.noordzij@erasmusmc.nl.
4
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. j.oudegroeniger@erasmusmc.nl.
5
Department of Public Administration and Sociology, Erasmus University, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands. j.oudegroeniger@erasmusmc.nl.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1007 MB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. je.lakerveld@vumc.nl.
7
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands. je.lakerveld@vumc.nl.
8
Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands. je.lakerveld@vumc.nl.
9
Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. f.vanlenthe@erasmusmc.nl.
10
Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands. f.vanlenthe@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

Low self-control and financial strain may limit individuals' capacity to resist temptations in the local food environment. We investigated the moderating role of self-control and financial strain in the relation between the food environment and higher body weight. We used data from 2812 Dutch adults who participated in the population-based GLOBE study in 2014. Participants' home addresses and the location of food retailers in 2013 were mapped using GIS. The density of fast food retailers and the totality of food retailers in Euclidean buffers of 250, 400 and 800 m around the home were linked to body mass index and overweight status. A higher density of fast food outlets (B (95% confidence interval (CI)) = -0.04 (-0.07; -0.01)) and the totality of food outlets (B (95% CI) = -0.01 (-0.01; -0.00)) were associated with a lower body mass index. Stratification showed that associations were strongest for those experiencing low self-control or great financial strain. For example, every additional fast food outlet was associated with a 0.17 point lower BMI in those with great financial strain, while not significantly associated with BMI in those with no financial strain. In conclusion, we did find support for a moderating role of self-control and financial strain, but associations between the food environment and weight status were not in the expected direction.

KEYWORDS:

GIS; body weight; cognitive bandwidth; food environment; interaction

PMID:
30823592
PMCID:
PMC6406643
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph16040674
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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