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Nutrition. 2019 May;61:208-212. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2018.11.006. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Effects of fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene polymorphisms on binge eating in women with binge-eating disorder: The moderating influence of attachment style.

Author information

1
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
2
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
3
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
4
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
5
Escuela de Nutrición y Dietética. Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Sebastián, Concepcion, Chile.
6
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
7
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
8
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: ggoldfield@cheo.on.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The genetics of binge-eating disorder (BED) is an emerging topic and one candidate pathway, namely the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene, may be implicated because of its role in food reward sensitivity and self-regulation of eating. The aims of this study were to examine the independent effects of variants of FTO on binge frequency in women with and without BED and to examine the moderating role of interpersonal attachment in this association.

METHODS:

Secondary data analysis was conducted on a cross-sectional comparison of three groups of women in a trial of group treatment for BED: BED with obesity (n = 73), BED without obesity (n = 55), and normal weight without BED (n = 50). Women were genotyped for five of the most common FTO single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs9939609, rs8050136, rs3751812, rs1421085, and rs1121980, which have been related to body mass index and energy intake. Binge frequency (Eating Disorder Examination), body composition (bioelectric impedance), and attachment (Attachment Style Questionnaire) were assessed.

RESULTS:

There were no significant between-group differences for frequencies of FTO alleles, nor were there any significant anthropometric associations. The FTO × attachment interaction was significant whereby, relative to a low-risk FTO genotype, individuals with a high-risk genotype for the SNP rs1421085 and high-avoidant attachment had higher mean binge frequency than those with high genetic risk but low-avoidant attachment (β = -7.96; t = -2.07; P = 0.042).

CONCLUSIONS:

FTO genotypes associated with risk for obesity and loss of control of eating, specifically rs1421085, may interact with insecure attachment in a way that may exacerbate binge eating among women with BED.

KEYWORDS:

Attachment; BED; FTO; Obesity

PMID:
30822753
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2018.11.006

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