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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2019 Jun;32(3):349-355. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12640. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Impacts of skipping breakfast and late dinner on the incidence of being overweight: a 3-year retrospective cohort study of men aged 20-49 years.

Author information

1
The Graduate School of Environmental Health, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Japan.
2
Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most studies on the dietary habits and overweight status of men aged 20-49 years have been cross-sectional, with longitudinal studies being scarce. One-quarter of Japanese men aged 20-49 years skip breakfast or have dinner within 2 h of bedtime (late dinner); therefore, the effects of these eating habits on men's increasing body weight need to be determined.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study using health check-up data provided from several health insurance societies in Japan. Participants comprised 45 524 men employees aged 20-49 years who were followed up for 3 years. The primary outcome investigated was body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg m-2 . We conducted a multivariable logistic regression analysis and calculated the odds ratios for skipping breakfast and late dinner, as well as baseline age, body mass index, smoking status, eating speed, snack-eating status, alcohol drinking frequency, physical activity, sleep habits, and the interaction between skipping breakfast and late dinner.

RESULTS:

Of the participants, 17 706 (38.8%) skipped breakfast and 25 987 (57.1%) had a late dinner. At the 3-year follow-up, 5093 (11.2%) had a BMI ≥25 kg m-2 . The odds ratios of men skipping breakfast and having a late dinner were 1.18 (95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.33) and 0.92 (95% confidence interval = 0.84-1.01), respectively. The interaction between these factors was nonsignificant.

CONCLUSIONS:

We suggest that skipping breakfast among men aged 20-49 years was one predictor of being overweight; however, having dinner within 2 h of bedtime was not a predictor.

KEYWORDS:

breakfast; eating habit; late dinner; overweight

PMID:
30821869
DOI:
10.1111/jhn.12640

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