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Int J Eat Disord. 2019 Mar 1. doi: 10.1002/eat.23065. [Epub ahead of print]

Course, risk factors, and adverse outcomes of disordered eating in pregnancy.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
2
The Felizberta Lo Padilla Tong School of Social Sciences, Caritas Institute of Higher Education, Hong Kong, China.
3
Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
4
Centre of Family and Population Research, The National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
6
Department of Psychology, The National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although eating disorders in pregnancy have been studied extensively, little research attention has been given to disordered eating. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence and levels of disordered eating in the perinatal period, and to identify risk factors and adverse outcomes of disordered eating during pregnancy.

METHOD:

A prospective longitudinal design with a quantitative approach was adopted. A consecutive sample of 1,470 Chinese pregnant women from hospitals in Hong Kong was assessed using standardized instruments at five time points from the first trimester to 6 months postpartum.

RESULTS:

The levels of disordered eating changed significantly across trimesters. Higher levels of disordered eating in pregnancy were significantly associated with higher levels of disordered eating at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, lower 1-min Apgar scores, and abnormal birth weight.

DISCUSSION:

The present study pointed to the need for more research and clinical attention to antenatal disordered eating given that it is associated with anxiety, depression, postpartum disordered eating and obstetric outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

antenatal mental health; anxiety; depression; disordered eating; infant development; obstetric outcomes; postpartum

PMID:
30821851
DOI:
10.1002/eat.23065

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