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Osteoporos Int. 2019 Feb 28. doi: 10.1007/s00198-019-04900-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Higher rates of osteoporosis treatment initiation and persistence in patients with newly diagnosed vertebral fracture when introduced in inpatients than later in outpatients.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1205, Geneva, Switzerland. Thierry.Chevalley@hcuge.ch.

Abstract

Whether in-hospital management of patients with newly identified vertebral fractures leads to a higher rate of osteoporosis medication than delayed outpatient management remains unknown. Our study showed that early osteoporosis therapy initiation in a fracture liaison service during hospital stay was a more efficacious strategy for secondary fracture prevention.

INTRODUCTION:

Fracture liaison services are standard care for secondary fracture prevention. A higher rate of osteoporosis treatment initiation may be considered when introduced in the hospital rather than an outpatient recommendation to a primary care physician (PCP). Whether this applies to patients with newly detected vertebral fractures in a general internal medicine ward remains unknown. We prospectively investigated whether in-hospital management of newly identified vertebral fractures led to a higher rate of osteoporosis medication initiation and persistence at 3 and 6 months than delayed outpatient management by a PCP.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective study including hospitalized patients > 60 years systematically searched for asymptomatic vertebral fractures on lateral chest and/or abdominal radiographs. Patients were included either in phase 1 (outpatient care recommendations on osteoporosis management to a PCP) or in phase 2 (inpatient care management initiated during hospitalization). The percentage of patients under osteoporosis treatment was evaluated by telephone interview at 3 and 6 months.

RESULTS:

Outpatients' (84 with fracture/407 assessed (21%); 75.7 ± 7.7 years) and inpatients' (100/524 (19%); 77.8 ± 9.4 years) characteristics were similar. Osteoporosis medication was more often prescribed in inpatients at 3 (67% vs. 19%, respectively; p < 0.001) and 6 months (69 vs. 27%, respectively; p < 0.001). The percentage under treatment was also higher in inpatients than in outpatients at 3 (52 vs. 19%, p < 0.001) and 6 months (54 vs. 22%, p < 0.001). Length of stay and destination post-discharge were not different between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early patient management after a newly detected vertebral fracture during hospitalization was a more efficacious strategy of secondary fracture prevention than delayed outpatient management following discharge.

KEYWORDS:

Fracture liaison service; Inpatients; Osteoporosis medication; Outpatients; Vertebral fracture

PMID:
30820609
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-019-04900-3

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