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Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg. 2019 Feb 28. doi: 10.1007/s00068-019-01101-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in polytrauma: Evaluation of bone and liver healing response in an experimental rat model.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey. aycakoca@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.
3
Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Ankara University Faculty of Science, Ankara, Turkey.
4
Stem Cell Institute, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.
5
Division of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.
6
Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.
7
Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Ankara University Faculty of Science, Ankara, Turkey. elcinmurat@gmail.com.
8
Biovalda Health Technologies, Inc, Ankara, Turkey. elcinmurat@gmail.com.
9
Faculty of Science, Biochemistry Division, Ankara University, Tandogan, 06100, Ankara, Turkey. elcinmurat@gmail.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Trauma is the most common cause of death of young people in the world. As known, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) accelerate tissue regeneration mechanisms. In our study, we aimed to investigate the effects of MSCs transplantation on the healing of liver and bone tissue by considering trauma secondary inflammatory responses.

METHODS:

56 adult Wistar-albino rats were divided into two groups: the polytrauma (liver and bone) (n = 28), and the liver trauma group (n = 28). At 36 h and 5th day after surgery, both rats with polytrauma and with isolated liver injury received either intravenous (IV) or intraperitoneal (IP) injections of MSCs (one million cells per kg body weight). Untreated groups received IV and IP saline injections. At day 21 after surgery, liver, tibia and fibula of the subjects were excised and evaluated for histopathologic and histomorphometric examination. Additionally, whole blood count (white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelets), C-reactive protein (CRP), glucose, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin, blood gas, and trauma markers interleukin-1B (IL-1B), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) levels were investigated.

RESULTS:

In general, MSC transplantations were well tolerated by the subjects. It was found that ALT, CRP, albumin were significantly lower in rats which received MSCs (p < 0.001). Inflammation of the liver and bone tissue in the MSC-injected rats were significantly lower than that of the untreated groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Herewith we have shown that MSC infusion in posttraumatic rats leads to less aggressive and more effective consequences on liver and bone tissue healing. Human MSC treatment for trauma is still in early stages of development; thus standard protocols, and patient inclusion criteria should be established beforehand clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

Emergency medicine; Experimental bone fractures; Experimental liver injury; Mesenchymal stem cells; Polytrauma; Rat model

PMID:
30820597
DOI:
10.1007/s00068-019-01101-9

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