Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Crohns Colitis. 2019 Mar 1. pii: jjz051. doi: 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz051. [Epub ahead of print]

European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation Topical Review on Complementary Medicine and Psychotherapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Beatriz Ângelo, Loures, Portugal.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta.
3
Department of Internal Medicine and Integrative Gastroenterology, Kliniken Essen-Mitte and Chair for Integrative Medicine and translational Gastroenterology, Klinikum Bamberg, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
4
School of Psychology, Deakin University Geelong, Burwood, Australia.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, IBD Unit, University Hospital Santiago De Compostela (CHUS), Santiago De Compostela, Spain.
6
Department of Gastroenterology, St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia.
7
IBD Centre, Department of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Institute, Rozzano, Milan, Italy.
8
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Division of Internal Medicine, University and Medical School of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
9
Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
10
Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, and Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
11
Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic, and Ageing Sciences, Università della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.
12
Department of Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine, Haaglanden Medisch Centrum, The Hague, The Netherlands.
13
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Center, Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease increasingly use alternative and complementary therapies, for which appropriate evidence is often lacking. It is estimated that up to half of all patients with IBD use various forms of complementary and alternative medicine during some point in their disease course. Considering the frequent use of such therapies, it is crucial that physicians and patients are informed about their efficacy and safety in order to provide guidance and evidence-based advice. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that some psychotherapies and mind-body interventions may be beneficial in the management of IBD, but their best use remains a matter of research. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of some of the most commonly used complementary, alternative, and psychotherapy interventions in IBD.

PMID:
30820529
DOI:
10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjz051

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for Norwegian BIBSYS system
Loading ...
Support Center