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Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Mar;98(9):e14640. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000014640.

Effects of climate factors on hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Changchun, 2013 to 2017.

Author information

1
Jilin Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Jilin University.
3
Jilin Provincial Climate Center.
4
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, School of Public Health, Jilin University.
5
Changchun Center for Disease Control and Preventiona.
6
The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.

Abstract

Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a rodent-borne disease caused by hantaviruses (HVs). Climate factors have a significant impact on the transmission of HFRS. Here, we characterized the dynamic temporal trend of HFRS and identified the roles of climate factors in its transmission in Changchun, China.Surveillance data of HFRS cases and data on related environmental variables from 2013 to 2017 were collected. A principal components regression (PCR) model was used to quantify the relationship between climate factors and transmission of HFRS.During 2013 to 2017, a distinctly declining temporal trend of annual HFRS incidence was identified. Four principal components were extracted, with a cumulative contribution rate of 89.282%. The association between HFRS epidemics and climate factors was better explained by the PCR model (F = 10.050, P <.001, adjusted R = 0.456) than by the general multiple regression model (F = 2.748, P <.005, adjusted R = 0.397).The monthly trends of HFRS were positively correlated with the mean wind velocity but negatively correlated with the mean temperature, relative humidity, sunshine duration, and accumulative precipitation of the different previous months. The study results may be useful for the development of HFRS preventive initiatives that are customized for Changchun regarding specific climate environments.

PMID:
30817583
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000014640
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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