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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Apr;27(4):645-652. doi: 10.1002/oby.22420. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Longitudinal Associations of Sleep Duration, Morning and Evening Cortisol, and BMI During Childhood.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.
2
Department of Psychology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA.
4
Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, USA.
7
Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to examine associations between sleep duration, BMI, and cortisol levels across childhood.

METHODS:

Participants included 361 children adopted domestically in the United States. Random-intercept cross-lagged panel models tested for between-person and bidirectional within-person associations of sleep duration, BMI, and morning and evening cortisol at age 4.5 to 9 years.

RESULTS:

Sleep duration and BMI were stable during childhood, inversely associated at the between-person level, and unrelated to morning or evening cortisol. BMI at age 6 years predicted longer sleep duration and lower evening cortisol at age 7 years, and lower morning cortisol at age 7 years predicted higher BMI at age 9 years within individuals.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between sleep and BMI is more likely a stable between-person phenomenon rather than a unidirectional association that develops within individuals over time.

PMID:
30816633
PMCID:
PMC6462140
[Available on 2019-08-28]
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22420

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