Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Biomed Opt. 2019 Feb;24(5):1-11. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.24.5.051412.

Bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri: bacteria respond quickly and sensitively to pulsed microwave electric (but not magnetic) fields.

Author information

1
Cardiff University, School of Engineering, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.
2
Cardiff University, School of Biosciences, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Biological systems with intrinsic luminescent properties serve as powerful and noninvasive bioreporters for real-time and label-free monitoring of cell physiology. This study employs the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri to investigate the effects of separated microwave electric (E) and magnetic (H) fields. Using a cylindrical TM010 mode aluminum resonant cavity, designed to spatially separate E and H fields of a pulsed microwave (2.45 GHz) input, we sampled at 100-ms intervals the 490-nm emission of bioluminescence from suspensions of the V. fischeri. E-field exposure (at 4.24 and 13.4 kV/m) results in rapid and sensitive responses to 100-ms pulses. H-field excitation elicits no measurable responses, even at 100-fold higher power input levels (equivalent to 183 A/m). The observed effects on bacterial light output partially correlate with measured E-field-induced temperature increases. In conclusion, the endogenous bioluminescence of V. fischeri provides a sensitive and noninvasive method to assess the biological effects of microwave fields.

KEYWORDS:

bioreporter; electromagnetic; noninvasive; nonthermal; thermal

PMID:
30816030
DOI:
10.1117/1.JBO.24.5.051412

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center