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Pathog Immun. 2019;4(1):66-78. doi: 10.20411/pai.v4i1.255. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Increased CMV IgG Antibody Titer is Associated with Non-AIDS Events among Virologically Suppressed HIV-Positive Persons.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases; Rush University Medical Center; Chicago Illinois.
2
Department of Immunology/Microbiology; Rush University Medical Center; Chicago Illinois.
3
Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research; Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; Boston Massachusetts.

Abstract

Background:

Among HIV-positive individuals, increased levels of inflammation and immune activation persist even in the setting of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with greater rates of non-AIDS events. The etiology of this persistent inflammation is incompletely understood.

Methods:

Using a well-characterized cohort of 322 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART, we conducted a case-control study. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, plasma biomarkers, and T-cell phenotypes were measured/characterized from samples collected 1 year after ART initiation. Conditional logistic regression for matched case-control studies analyzed the associations of year 1 CMV-specific IgG level with the subsequent occurrence of any non-AIDS event. Correlations between continuous CMV IgG antibody levels and soluble and cellular markers were assessed.

Results:

We found that higher levels of CMV IgG were associated with increased risk of non-AIDS events (OR = 1.58 per IQR [95% CI: 1.12, 2.24], P = 0.01) and with elevated soluble and cellular markers of inflammation.

Conclusions:

The magnitude of the host immune response to CMV may play a role in the persistent inflammation and resultant morbid events observed in the HIV-positive population.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; cardiovascular events; cytomegalovirus (CMV); immunity; inflammation; malignancy

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST None of the authors have a commercial association that might pose a conflict of interest. Dr. Alan Landay is an associate editor for Pathogens and Immunity.

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