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Heliyon. 2019 Feb 15;5(2):e01213. doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e01213. eCollection 2019 Feb.

Moderating effects of crocin on some stress oxidative markers in rat brain following demyelination with ethidium bromide.

Author information

1
Physiology Research Center (PRC), Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
2
Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
3
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Abstract

Background:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Crocin on oxidative markers (GPx, SOD, MDA) in animal model of demyelination with Ethidium bromide (EB).

Methods:

Female Wistar rats were assigned in to 4 groups; Sham, with no receiving any agent (Sham), Sham Operated group with injection of EB into the brain received no agent (SO), Sham Treatment group with injection of EB and receiving PBS as vehicle and Treatment group with injection of EB and receiving Crocin (100 mg/kg). Demyelination was induced by single dose injection of 10 μl of EB 0.1% into the Cisterna magna of the brain. Crocin was diluted and applied to each animal for 21 days, once per day gavage. The levels of oxidative markers (GPx, SOD and MDA) were measured by related standard kits. Data were analyzed by paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc test.

Results:

The results showed that crocin decreases the levels of GPx and SOD significantly as well as MDA level after 21 days (α ≤ 0.05). In addition, results showed that there were significant differences in the GPx, SOD and MDA levels between all groups at post treatment phase (α ≤ 0.05).

Conclusion:

It can be concluded that crocin can moderate the level of oxidative markers after demyelination of the brain cells in MS cases. Due to this effect, crocin can be considered as an effective anti-oxidant in management of degenerative nervous system diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Neuroscience

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