Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ther Adv Neurol Disord. 2019 Feb 18;12:1756286418819074. doi: 10.1177/1756286418819074. eCollection 2019.

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduces peripheral oxidative stress and inflammation in interferon-β1a-treated multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Centre, Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Odontostomatology, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5 - Building 17, Ground floor, Naples, Italy.
2
Medical Affairs Department, Merck, Rome, Italy.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Odontostomatology, Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Center, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
4
Neuroimmunology Unit, Fondazione Santa Lucia, Rome, Italy.
5
Department of Biology, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
6
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
7
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology, National Research Council (IEOS-CNR), Naples, Italy.
8
Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK.

Abstract

Background:

Oxidative stress is a driver of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. We evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on laboratory markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, and on MS clinical severity.

Methods:

We included 60 relapsing-remitting patients with MS treated with interferon beta1a 44μg (IFN-β1a) with CoQ10 for 3 months, and with IFN-β1a 44μg alone for 3 more months (in an open-label crossover design). At baseline and at the 3 and 6-month visits, we measured markers of scavenging activity, oxidative damage and inflammation in the peripheral blood, and collected data on disease severity.

Results:

After 3 months, CoQ10 supplementation was associated with improved scavenging activity (as mediated by uric acid), reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production, reduced oxidative DNA damage, and a shift towards a more anti-inflammatory milieu in the peripheral blood [with higher interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and lower eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-1α, IL-2R, IL-9, IL-17F, macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation-normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Also, CoQ10 supplementation was associated with lower Expanded Disability Status Scale, fatigue severity scale, Beck's depression inventory, and the visual analogue scale for pain.

Conclusions:

CoQ10 supplementation improved scavenging activity, reduced oxidative damage, and induced a shift towards a more anti-inflammatory milieu, in the peripheral blood of relapsing-remitting MS patients treated with 44μg IFN-β1a 44μg. A possible clinical effect was noted but deserves to be confirmed over longer follow ups.

KEYWORDS:

antioxidant; coenzyme Q10; inflammation; multiple sclerosis; oxidative stress

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest statement: MM received research grants from MAGNIMS-ECTRIMS and Merck. GM received research grants from Merck, Biogen Idec and Novartis. VBM and RL received honoraria from Almirall, Bayer, Biogen Idec, Genzyme, Merck, Novartis, and Roche.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center