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J Vestib Res. 2018;28(5-6):379-384. doi: 10.3233/VES-190648.

Use of the Bárány Society criteria to diagnose benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Author information

1
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common vestibular disorder affecting about 20% of dizzy patients. Early diagnosis and treatment can improve the quality of life for patients.

OBJECTIVE:

We reviewed the classifications of different subtypes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and the problems we encountered using the diagnostic criteria of the Bárány Society.

METHODS:

Both the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and supine roll test were performed on 568 patients, and diagnoses were made based on patient history and the type of provoked nystagmus (if any). Next, the numbers of patients with each subtype and other parameters, including age and sex, were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Posterior semicircular canal BPPV (pc-BPPV) accounted for the largest proportion, followed by horizontal semicircular canal BPPV (hc-BPPV). Both anterior canal BPPV and multiple canal lithiasis BPPV were rare, and no patient was diagnosed with cupulolithiasis of the posterior canal.

CONCLUSIONS:

pc-BPPV, hc-BPPV, and cupulolithiasis of the horizontal canal (hc-BPPV-cu) were the three major subtypes that could be definitively diagnosed, whereas the diagnoses of possible benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (pBPPV) and probable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo [spontaneously resolved] (pBPPVsr) require further investigation, with special attention being paid to appropriate differentiation and repositioning maneuvers.

KEYWORDS:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; canalithiasis; classification; cupulolithiasis

PMID:
30814370
DOI:
10.3233/VES-190648
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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