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BMC Womens Health. 2019 Feb 26;19(1):36. doi: 10.1186/s12905-019-0735-0.

The associations between intimate partner violence and maternal health care service utilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
College of Health and Medical Sciences, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia. atinaf.musa2@gmail.com.
2
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia. atinaf.musa2@gmail.com.
3
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
4
College of Health and Medical Sciences, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intimate partner violence exposes women to a wide range of health problems that can either directly or indirectly lead to maternal death. Although in a number of studies intimate partner violence has been associated with inadequate utilization of antenatal care and skilled delivery care, in other studies no association has been found. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively review the evidence, and quantify the strength and direction of the association between intimate partner violence and utilizing adequate antenatal and skilled delivery care services.

METHOD:

We systematically searched studies from MEDLINE, Embase, Psych INFO, CINAHL, and Maternity and Infant Care. Two independent reviewers screened the articles for eligibility. Quality and risk of bias in the articles were evaluated by using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for observational studies. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed to estimate the association of intimate partner violence and antenatal care, and skilled delivery care. Random-effects models were used to allow for the significant heterogeneity that might possibly be found between studies. The degree of heterogeneity was expressed by using the I2 statistic.

RESULTS:

The meta-analyses have shown that women who experienced intimate partner violence had 25% decreased odds (AOR = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.61, 0.92) of using adequate antenatal care than those who did not experience IPV. Similarly, women who experienced IPV had 20% decreased odds (AOR = 0.8, 95%CI = 0.69, 0.92) of using skilled delivery care compared to those who did not experience IPV.

CONCLUSION:

The meta-analyses indicated that experiencing intimate partner violence is associated with a lower likelihood of receiving adequate antenatal care and skilled delivery care. Both community-based and facility-based interventions that target the reduction of partner violence, and strictly implementing proven health facility-based counselling interventions, could aid in improving utilization of maternal health care services.

KEYWORDS:

Intimate partner violence; Maternal health care service use; Meta-analysis; Systematic review

PMID:
30808353
PMCID:
PMC6390526
DOI:
10.1186/s12905-019-0735-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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