Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuropharmacology. 2019 Feb 23. pii: S0028-3908(19)30060-7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2019.02.027. [Epub ahead of print]

Social modulation of drug use and drug addiction.

Author information

1
BAGAMORE Team, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, UMR7289 CNRS & Aix-Marseille Université, France.
2
BAGAMORE Team, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, UMR7289 CNRS & Aix-Marseille Université, France. Electronic address: christelle.baunez@univ-amu.fr.

Abstract

This review aims to demonstrate how social science and behavioral neurosciences have highlighted the influence of social interactions on drug use in animal models. In neurosciences, the effect of global social context that are distal from drug use has been widely studied. For human and other social animals such as monkeys and rodents, positive social interactions are rewarding, can overcome drug reward and, in all, protect from drug use. In contrast, as other types of stress, negative social experiences facilitate the development and maintenance of drug abuse. However, interest recently emerged in the effect of so-called "proximal" social factors, that is, social interactions during drug-taking. These recent studies have characterized the role of the drug considered, the sharing of drug experience and the familiarity of the peer which interaction are made with. We also examine the few studies regarding the sensorial mediator of social behaviors and critically review the neural mediation of social factors on drug use. However, despite considerable characterization of the factors modulating distal influences, the mechanisms for proximal influences on drug use remain largely unknown.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Cocaine; Conditioned place preference; Drug selfadministration; Opiate; Peer presence

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center