Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2019 Feb 25. doi: 10.1038/s41409-019-0480-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Autologous stem cell transplantation for HIV-associated lymphoma in the antiretroviral and rituximab era: a retrospective study by the EBMT Lymphoma Working Party.

Author information

1
University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. kai.huebel@uni-koeln.de.
2
Hematology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
3
EBMT Paris Study Office/CEREST-TC, Paris, France.
4
Hopital Saint-Antoine, EBMT Paris Study Office, Paris, France.
5
Rotkreuzklinikum München, München, Germany.
6
University Hospital's Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
7
Praxis am Ebertplatz, Cologne, Germany.
8
Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano, Italy.
9
Hammersmith Hospital London, London, UK.
10
Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain.
11
Hospital Center University, Montpellier, France.
12
University Hospital Antwerpen, Antwerpen, Belgium.
13
Hospital Universitaria Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain.
14
University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
15
Klinikum Harlaching, München, Germany.
16
University College Hospital, London, UK.
17
Hospital de la Santa Creu i Santpau, Barcelona, Spain.
18
Hospital dos Capuchos, Lisboa, Portugal.
19
St. Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.
20
University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

The present study aimed at describing the outcome of patients with HIV-associated lymphomas following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (autoHCT) in the rituximab and combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era. Eligible for this retrospective study were HIV-positive patients with lymphoma who received autoHCT between 2007 and 2013. A total of 118 patients were included with a median age of 45 years (range 24-66). Underlying diagnoses were diffuse large B cell lymphoma in 47%, Hodgkin lymphoma in 24%, Burkitt lymphoma in 18%, and plasmablastic lymphoma in 7% of patients. Disease status at autoHCT was complete remission in 44%, partial remission (PR) in 38%, and less than PR in 18% of the patients. With a median follow-up of 4 years, 3-year non-relapse mortality, incidence of relapse, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 10%, 27%, 63% and 66%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, disease status less than PR but not CD4+ cell count at the time of autoHCT was a significant predictor of unfavorable PFS and OS. In conclusion, in the era of cART and chemoimmunotherapy, the outcome of autoHCT for HIV-related lymphoma is driven by lymphoma-dependent risk factors rather than by characteristics of the HIV infection.

PMID:
30804486
DOI:
10.1038/s41409-019-0480-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center