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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Mar;27(3):380-384. doi: 10.1002/oby.22382.

Log Often, Lose More: Electronic Dietary Self-Monitoring for Weight Loss.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
3
Medical Biostatistics Unit, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA.
4
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Dietary self-monitoring is consistently related to both short- and long-term weight loss. The purpose of this study was to quantify the time spent and the daily frequency of self-monitoring necessary for weight-loss success.

METHODS:

Participants in a 24-week, online, behavioral weight-control intervention recorded daily dietary intake using a Web-based dietary analysis program. Time spent self-monitoring and frequency of dietary journal page access were captured. Weight loss (kilograms) and the proportion of participants losing ≥ 5% and ≥ 10% of baseline weight were assessed at 6 months.

RESULTS:

Participants (n = 142; BMI 35.8 kg/m2 ; 90.8% female; 23.2% African American) spent an average of 23.2 minutes per day self-monitoring in month 1 and 14.6 minutes in month 6. For those still recording any minutes self-monitoring by month 6 (65.5%), there were no significant differences in time spent based on weight loss; however, those losing either ≥ 5% or ≥ 10% logged in to the journal Web page significantly more times per day (1.6 vs. 2.4, P < 0.001 for < 5% vs. ≥ 5%; 1.7 vs. 2.7, P < 0.001 for < 10% vs. ≥ 10%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The frequency of self-monitoring is significantly related to weight loss, with the time needed to be successful diminishing during the intervention.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01232699.

PMID:
30801989
PMCID:
PMC6647027
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22382
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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