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MedEdPORTAL. 2017 Aug 9;13:10615. doi: 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10615.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescent Health: An Interprofessional Case Discussion.

Author information

1
Associate Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health.
2
Core Investigator, Institute for Behavioral and Community Health.
3
Co-Director of the Nursing Fellowship, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital.
4
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
5
Medical Director of Behavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital.
6
Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Nationwide Children's Hospital.
7
Master of Public Health Student, Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health.
8
Division Manager, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital.
9
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School.
10
Program Director of the Adolescent Medicine Fellowship, Boston Children's Hospital.
11
Associate Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
12
Co-Director of the LEAH Nursing Fellowship, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital.
13
Clinical Professor of Nursing, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University.

Abstract

Introduction:

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents frequently endure considerable adversity as they encounter identity-related stigma. As a result, LGBT adolescents are often at disproportionate risk for experiencing negative social and health outcomes.

Methods:

This four-module curriculum allows learners to explore challenges common to the clinical care of LGBT adolescents while also providing exposure to current trends and evidence in LGBT health. Through a combination of reflective exercises, didactic lectures, foundational readings, facilitated case discussion, and debate, the curriculum introduces learners to issues of assessment, treatment, and support as they relate to LGBT youth. The curriculum was written for use with learners in an interprofessional training program representing the disciplines of medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and psychology.

Results:

Four years of evaluation data indicate that the curriculum is particularly useful for exposing learners to the complexities of serving and supporting LGBT youth and identifying personal skills that may require additional development. Learners emerge with greater confidence in identifying local and national LGBT resources.

Discussion:

Incorporating cultural humility is key to fostering a commitment to lifelong learning and maintaining learners' confidence when working with marginalized populations. Optimal discussion occurs when learners in all disciplines contribute, yet instructors can teach modules separately or modify them when learners from all disciplines are not present. In addition, learners emerge with greater confidence in connecting with outside resources, which assists both referrals for patients and self-directed learning.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent Health; Case-Based Learning; Communication Skills; Debate; Health Disparities; Interprofessional Collaboration; LGBT; Lecture; Sexual Minorities

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