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Mol Cell Neurosci. 2019 Jun;97:34-42. doi: 10.1016/j.mcn.2019.02.001. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A as a potential biomarker in synaptopathies.

Author information

1
Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: Kerstin.Heurling@gu.se.
2
Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, London, UK; NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health & Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia at South, Maudsley NHS Foundation, London, UK.
3
Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Clinical Memory Research Unit, Lund University, Sweden.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; Graduate Program in Biological Sciences: Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; Brain Institute of Rio Grande do Sul (BraIns), Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden; Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK; UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK.
7
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; PET Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
8
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Medical Physics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
9
Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Clinical Memory Research Unit, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK.

Abstract

Measuring synaptic density in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging-based biomarkers targeting the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) has received much attention recently due to its potential research and clinical applications in synaptopathies, including neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. Fluid-based biomarkers in proteinopathies have previously been suggested to provide information on pathology and disease status that is complementary to PET-based measures, and the same can be hypothesized with respect to SV2A. This review provides an overview of the current state of SV2A PET imaging as a biomarker of synaptic density, the potential role of fluid-based biomarkers for SV2A, and related future perspectives.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Position emission tomography; SV2A; Synaptopathies

PMID:
30796959
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcn.2019.02.001
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