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Eat Weight Disord. 2019 Feb 22. doi: 10.1007/s40519-019-00657-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Health beliefs, behaviors, and symptoms associated with orthorexia nervosa.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Texas State University, 601 University Dr, San Marcos, TX, 78666, USA. oberle@txstate.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Texas State University, 601 University Dr, San Marcos, TX, 78666, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This research explored whether symptoms of orthorexia nervosa (ON), a condition involving obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors regarding healthy eating, are associated with differences pertaining to use of nutritional supplements and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques, to health locus of control, and to symptoms of poor physical health.

METHOD:

An anonymous online survey assessing the variables above was completed by college students at a university in the southern United States: 47 in the ON symptoms group, 50 in the healthy-eating control group, and 83 in the normal-eating control group.

RESULTS:

Compared to both control groups, the ON symptoms group reported greater supplement use and CAM participation, more reasons for these behaviors for the purpose of improving psychological health (i.e., to increase energy, enhance focus, and improve mood), and greater symptoms associated with poor physical health. None of the groups differed on internal or external health locus of control.

CONCLUSION:

For those with ON, "healthy" eating behaviors are accompanied by other health behaviors that include supplement use and CAM activities. However, despite their goal of achieving perfect health, these individuals experience diminished physical health with symptoms that may be related to their severe dietary restrictions.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level V, descriptive cross-sectional study.

KEYWORDS:

Complementary and alternative medicine; Health locus of control; Health symptoms; Orthorexia; Supplement use

PMID:
30796739
DOI:
10.1007/s40519-019-00657-0

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