Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Stem Cell Res Ther. 2019 Feb 22;10(1):63. doi: 10.1186/s13287-019-1166-4.

Autologous mesenchymal stromal cells embedded in tricalcium phosphate for posterolateral spinal fusion: results of a prospective phase I/II clinical trial with long-term follow-up.

Author information

1
Trauma and Orthopedics Service, IBSAL - University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. jfblanco@usal.es.
2
Network Center in Regenerative Medicine and Cellular Therapy of Castilla y León, Salamanca, Spain. jfblanco@usal.es.
3
Trauma and Orthopedics Department, IBSAL - University Hospital of Salamanca, Paseo de San Vicente 58-182, 37007, Salamanca, Spain. jfblanco@usal.es.
4
Hematology Service, IBSAL - University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
5
Network Center in Regenerative Medicine and Cellular Therapy of Castilla y León, Salamanca, Spain.
6
Trauma and Orthopedics Service, IBSAL - University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Posterolateral spinal fusion with autologous bone graft is considered the "gold standard" for lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) when surgical treatment is indicated. The potential role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to replace the bone graft in this setting has not been fully addressed.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the safety, feasibility and potential clinical efficacy of the implantation of autologous MSCs embedded with tricalcium phosphate as a therapeutic alternative to bone graft in patients with DDD during posterolateral spine fusion.

STUDY DESIGN:

Phase I/II single-arm prospective clinical trial.

METHODS:

Eleven patients with monosegmental DDD at L4-L5 or L5-S1 level were included. Autologous bone marrow-derived MSC were expanded in our Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) Facility and implanted during spinal surgery embedded in a tricalcium phosphate carrier. Monitoring of patients included a postoperative period of 12 months with four visits (after the 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th month), with clinical and radiological assessment that included the visual analog scale (VAS), the Oswestry disability index (ODI), the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the vertebral fusion grade observed through a simple Rx, and the evaluation of possible complications or adverse reactions. In addition, all patients were further followed up to 5 years for outcome.

RESULTS:

Median age of patients included was 44 years (range 30-58 years), and male/female ratio was (6/5) L4-L5 and L5-S1 DDD was present five and six patients, respectively. Autologous MSCs were expanded in all cases. There were no adverse effects related to cell implantation. Regarding efficacy, both VAS and ODI scores improved after surgery. Radiologically, 80% of patients achieved lumbar fusion at the end of the follow-up. No adverse effects related to the procedure were recorded.

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of autologous MSCs for spine fusion in patients with monosegmental degenerative disc disease is feasible, safe, and potentially effective.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

no. EudraCT: 2010-018335-17 ; code Identifier: NCT01513694 ( clinicaltrials.gov ).

KEYWORDS:

Autologous mesenchymal stromal cells; Bone graft; Cell therapy; DDD; Lumbar degenerative disc disease; MSC; Spinal fusion; Spine surgery

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center