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BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Feb 22;19(1):132. doi: 10.1186/s12913-019-3952-1.

Advancing towards contemporary practice: a systematic review of organisational performance measures for non-acute health charities.

Author information

1
New South Wales (NSW) Rural Doctors Network, Hamilton, NSW, Australia. rcolbran@nswrdn.com.au.
2
School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
3
School of Psychology, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Organisational performance measurement is a recognised business management tool and essential for survival and success. There is a paucity of methodological studies of organisational performance measurement relating to non-acute healthcare charities and this study is the first to suggest a set of evidence-informed organisational performance measures for the sector.

METHODS:

This study was designed using a two-staged approach. A systematic review of peer-reviewed journal literature between 2003 and 2016 was conducted according to the twenty-seven (27) point checklist of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) complemented by a thematic analysis of eligible data using a cutting and sorting technique to generate a set of common measures of organisational performance for non-acute health charities.

RESULTS:

Not one study was found relating to organisational performance of non-acute healthcare charities however four records met eligibility criteria relating to non-acute or primary healthcare services with charitable fundraising capability. Three were case studies of specific organisations that related their approach to organisational performance measurement, while the fourth compared a case study organisation to a public service. Three different organisational performance frameworks and 20 organisational performance measures were used across the four studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study concluded that (1) demonstration of organisational performance is relevant to non-acute health charities; (2) organisational performance measurement is feasible in this sector; (3) an evidence-based organisational performance measurement framework for the sector has not yet been developed nor has an existing organisational performance measurement framework been adapted for the sector, although the Balanced Scorecard is likely to be an effective option and (4) five leading measures - Quality of Service; Finance; Stakeholders (Customers and Clients); People and Culture; and Governance and Business Management; could be used to determine organisational performance in these sectors. Finally, 'Mission and Purpose' could be explored as a potential measure. Further research to understand why there is such limited published organisational performance evidence for the sector could be useful. Case studies of organisational measurement strategies of successful non-acute healthcare charities and research into important factors for organisational performance implementation in the sector may contribute to greater uptake and knowledge dissemination.

KEYWORDS:

Charity; Non-acute healthcare; Non-government; Non-profit; Organisational performance measurement

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