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J Tissue Eng Regen Med. 2019 Apr;13(4):694-703. doi: 10.1002/term.2828. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Tissue-engineered trachea from a 3D-printed scaffold enhances whole-segment tracheal repair in a goat model.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
3
Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
5
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shanghai 9th People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

Traditional treatment therapies for tracheal stenosis often cause severe post-operative complications. To solve the current difficulties, novel and more suitable long-term treatments are needed. A whole-segment tissue-engineered trachea (TET) representing the native goat trachea was 3D printed using a poly(caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold engineered with autologous auricular cartilage cells. The TET underwent mechanical analysis followed by in vivo implantations in order to evaluate the clinical feasibility and potential. The 3D-printed scaffolds were successfully cellularized, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical force compression studies revealed that both PCL scaffolds and TETs have a more robust compressive strength than does the native trachea. In vivo implantation of TETs in the experimental group resulted in significantly higher mean post-operative survival times, 65.00 ± 24.01 days (n = 5), when compared with the control group, which received autologous trachea grafts, 17.60 ± 3.51 days (n = 5). Although tracheal narrowing was confirmed by bronchoscopy and computed tomography examination in the experimental group, tissue necrosis was only observed in the control group. Furthermore, an encouraging epithelial-like tissue formation was observed in the TETs after transplantation. This large animal study provides potential preclinical evidence around the employment of an orthotopic transplantation of a whole 3D-printed TET.

KEYWORDS:

3D-printed; PCL; goat; large animal experiment; tissue-engineered trachea; trachea transplantation

PMID:
30793848
DOI:
10.1002/term.2828

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