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Neuroscience. 2019 Apr 15;404:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.01.055. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

State-Dependent Spike and Local Field Synchronization between the Thalamic Parafascicular Nucleus and the Dorsal Striatum in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Author information

1
Key laboratory of Animal Resistance Biology of Shandong Province, College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, People's Republic of China.
2
Key laboratory of Animal Resistance Biology of Shandong Province, College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: wangmin@sdnu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Recent studies on the impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the thalamostriatal pathway have mainly focused on the structural and functional changes in the thalamus projection to the striatum. Alterations in the electrophysiological activity of the thalamostriatal circuit in PD have not been intensively studied. To further investigate this circuit, parafascicular nucleus (PF) single-unit spikes and dorsal striatum local field potential (LFP) activities were simultaneously recorded in control and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats during inattentive rest or treadmill walking states. We classified the PF neurons into two predominant subtypes (PF I and PF II). During rest state, after dopamine loss, increased PF I spike and striatal LFP coherence was observed in the beta-frequency (12-35 Hz), with changed PF I neuronal firing pattern and unchanged firing rates of the two neuron subtypes. However, in a treadmill walking state, PF II neurons displayed markedly increased coherence to striatal beta oscillations in the dopamine-depleted rats, as well as an altered PF II neuronal firing pattern and significantly decreased firing rates of the two neuron subtypes. The results indicate that in PD animals, state transition from rest to moving, such as treadmill walking, is associated with different PF neuron types and increased spike-LFP synchronization, which may provide new paradigms for understanding and treating PD.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson's disease; dorsal striatum; parafascicular thalamic nucleus; synchronization

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