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Clin Transplant. 2019 Apr;33(4):e13504. doi: 10.1111/ctr.13504. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Epstein-Barr virus latent gene EBNA-1 genetic diversity among transplant patients compared with patients with infectious mononucleosis.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
The Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
The Transplant and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

As a step toward evaluating the association between Epstein-Barr virus genetic diversity and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), we conducted a preliminary study to compare the genetic diversity of the EBNA-1 gene among transplant patients and patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM).

METHODS:

We sequenced the EBNA-1 gene in blood samples from study subjects using Sanger methodology. The sequences were aligned with a reference strain and compared with publicly available sequences.

RESULTS:

We analyzed 33 study samples and 25 publicly available sequences along with the reference strain B95-8. The evaluable samples were from sixteen patients with IM (median age 14.0 years, range 2-24) and 17 transplant patients. There were six children without PTLD (median age 1.93 years, range 0.79-7.46) and 11 who developed PTLD (median age 5.67 years, range 0.96-17.45). A predominant EBNA-1 variant (P-thr) was identified across the study groups. Differences were observed between the samples from the IM patients compared with the transplant samples.

CONCLUSION:

The predominant EBNA-1 strain is in contrast to reports of the predominant strain in North America. The results suggest differences between the EBNA-1 strains among the study groups. Further studies will examine the relationship between EBNA-1 strains and PTLD occurrence and outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Epstein-Barr virus; genetic diversity; infectious mononucleosis; posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder

PMID:
30790353
DOI:
10.1111/ctr.13504

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