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Cancer Causes Control. 2019 Apr;30(4):355-363. doi: 10.1007/s10552-019-01139-5. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Metabolic syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women: a prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. Rhonda.Arthur@einstein.yu.edu.
2
, 16 Bon Air Avenue, New Rochelle, NY, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.
7
Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Great Neck, NY, USA.
8
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
10
Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA.
11
Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) contributes to endometrial cancer risk over and above the contribution of obesity.

METHODS:

We examined the association of MetS and its components with risk of endometrial cancer in a sub-cohort of 24,210 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative cohort study. Two variants of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition of the MetS were used: one including and one excluding waist circumference (WC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of the study exposures with disease risk.

RESULTS:

When WC was included in the definition, MetS showed an approximately two-fold increase in endometrial cancer risk (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.61-3.02); however, when WC was excluded, MetS was no longer associated with risk. We also observed that women with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, in combination, had almost a twofold increased risk of endometrial cancer, independent of WC (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.09, 3.46). Glucose, and, in particular, WC and body mass index were also positively associated with risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that MetS may predict risk of endometrial cancer independent of obesity among women with the remaining four Mets components.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal adiposity; Endometrial cancer; Metabolic syndrome; Obesity; Postmenopausal women

PMID:
30788634
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-019-01139-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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