Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage Clin. 2019;22:101721. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2019.101721. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome show intact prediction but reduced adaptation in responses to repeated sounds: Evidence from Bayesian mapping.

Author information

1
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; DTU Compute, Cognitive Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark; Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Boserupvej 2, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark; Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: m.larsen@uq.edu.au.
2
DTU Compute, Cognitive Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
3
Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Boserupvej 2, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark; Synaptic Transmission, H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, DK-2500, Valby, Denmark.
4
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark.
5
Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Boserupvej 2, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Synaptic Transmission, H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, DK-2500, Valby, Denmark.
7
Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Boserupvej 2, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia; Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia; School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia.
9
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

One of the most common copy number variants, the 22q11.2 microdeletion, confers an increased risk for schizophrenia. Since schizophrenia has been associated with an aberrant neural response to repeated stimuli through both reduced adaptation and prediction, we here hypothesized that this may also be the case in nonpsychotic individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. We recorded high-density EEG from 19 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (12-25 years), as well as 27 healthy volunteers with comparable age and sex distribution, while they listened to a sequence of sounds arranged in a roving oddball paradigm. Using posterior probability maps and dynamic causal modelling we tested three different models accounting for repetition dependent changes in cortical responses as well as in effective connectivity; namely an adaptation model, a prediction model, and a model including both adaptation and prediction. Repetition-dependent changes were parametrically modulated by a combination of adaptation and prediction and were apparent in both cortical responses and in the underlying effective connectivity. This effect was reduced in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion and was negatively correlated with negative symptom severity. Follow-up analysis showed that the reduced effect of the combined adaptation and prediction model seen in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion was driven by reduced adaptation rather than prediction failure. Our findings suggest that adaptation is reduced in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion, which can be interpreted in light of the framework of predictive coding as a failure to suppress prediction errors.

KEYWORDS:

22q11 deletion syndrome; Dynamic causal modelling; EEG; Mismatch negativity; Posterior probability maps; Repetition suppression

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center