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J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care. 2019 Jan-Dec;18:2325958219826612. doi: 10.1177/2325958219826612.

Alcohol-Related Intentional Antiretroviral Nonadherence among People Living with HIV: Test of an Interactive Toxicity Beliefs Process Model.

Author information

1
1 Institute for Collaboration on Health Intervention and Policy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
2
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Mercer University, School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA.

Abstract

Beliefs that it is harmful to mix medications with alcohol (ie, interactive toxicity beliefs) are a known source of intentional antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence. This study examined a serial process model of alcohol-ART interactive toxicity beliefs, alcohol-ART avoidance behaviors, and ART adherence in the association between alcohol use and HIV viral load. Participants were 198 patients receiving ART from a community clinic in the southeastern United States; 125 reported current alcohol use. Results showed that current alcohol use was associated with detectable HIV viral load, partially accounted for by alcohol-ART interactive toxicity beliefs, alcohol-ART avoidance behaviors, and ART adherence. There was a significant indirect effect of the serial chain of interactive toxicity beliefs-avoidance behaviors-adherence, indicating the 3 intermediating variables partially accounted for the relationship between alcohol use and HIV viral load. Addressing alcohol use as a barrier to ART adherence requires multipronged approaches that address intentional nonadherence.

KEYWORDS:

HIV treatment; alcohol use; intentional nonadherence

PMID:
30782051
DOI:
10.1177/2325958219826612

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