Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Stem Cell Res. 2019 Mar;35:101405. doi: 10.1016/j.scr.2019.101405. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Generation of human iPSCs from fetal prostate fibroblasts HPrF.

Author information

1
Department of Cytokinetics, Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne's University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
2
Department of Cytokinetics, Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Clinical and Molecular Pathology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Medical Genetics, University Hospital Olomouc and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
5
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
6
Reprofit International, Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Brno, Czech Republic.
7
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne's University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
8
Department of Cytokinetics, Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne's University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address: ksoucek@ibp.cz.

Abstract

Human induced pluripotent stem cell line was generated from commercially available primary human prostate fibroblasts HPrF derived from a fetus, aged 18-24 weeks of gestation. The fibroblast cell line was reprogrammed with Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC, KLF4) using CytoTune™-iPS 2.0 Sendai Reprogramming Kit. Pluripotency of the derived transgene-free iPS cell line was confirmed both in vitro by detecting the expression of factors of pluripotency on a single-cell level, and in vivo using teratoma formation assay. This iPS cell line will be a useful tool for studying both normal prostate development and prostate cancer disease.

PMID:
30776675
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2019.101405
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center