Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 May;120:118-122. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.02.004. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Outcome of drug-induced sleep endoscopy-directed surgery for persistent obstructive sleep apnea after adenotonsillar surgery.

Author information

1
Otorhinolaryngology Department, Hospital General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain; Medicine Department, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: eesteller@gmail.com.
2
Otorhinolaryngology Department, Hospital General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Otorhinolaryngology Department, Hospital General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain; Medicine Department, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Nursing Service, Hospital Universitari General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain; Sant Ildefons Cornellà Health Centre, Institut Català de la Salut, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is suitable for evaluating persistent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) after adenotonsillar surgery as a means to guide surgical intervention, yet few studies demonstrate its usefulness in resolving the syndrome. We describe our experience of DISE-directed surgery in children with persistent OSAS by analysing objective and subjective outcomes of this treatment.

METHODS:

Prospective study of 20 otherwise healthy 2-12 year-old children with OSAS persisting after adenotonsillar surgery. All patients underwent DISE-directed surgery and were followed up clinically and with a polysomnogram at 12 ± 3 months.

RESULTS:

All 20 children had an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score ≥1 (mean: 6.1 ± 4.9) and 75% had AHI>3 before surgery. We performed a total of 14 total tonsillectomies (70%), 7 with associated pharyngoplasties; 5 radiofrequency turbinate reductions (25%); 7 radiofrequency lingual tonsil reductions (35%); and 10 revision adenoidectomies (50%). No surgery-related complications were observed. AHI scores at follow-up were significantly lower than AHI scores before surgery (1.895 ± 1.11 vs 6.143 ± 4.88; p < 0.05) and, in 85% (n = 17) of patients, AHI was below 3. There was a significant reduction in the number of children with AHI>3 in follow-up at 12 ± 3 months (15%; n = 3) compared to before surgery (75%; n = 15) (p < 0.005).

CONCLUSION:

DISE-directed surgery for otherwise healthy children with persistent OSAS is a useful and safe technique to decide a therapeutic strategy and to obtain good objective and subjective results regarding resolution of the syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Adenotonsillar hypertrophy; Adenotonsillar surgery; Drug-induced sleep endoscopy; Paediatric obstructive sleep apnea; Persistent obstructive sleep apnea

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center