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Reprod Biomed Online. 2019 Apr;38(4):570-578. doi: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2018.12.026. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Distinctive subpopulations of the intestinal microbiota are present in women with unexplained chronic anovulation.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keio University Graduate School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, -Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Reproduction and Infertility Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8511, Japan.
2
Reproduction and Infertility Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8511, Japan; Advanced Reproductive Medicine Research Centre, International University Health and Welfare School of Medicine, 4-3 Kozunomori, Narita Shi, Chiba 286-8686, Japan. Electronic address: kazuhironanami@gmail.com.
3
Denentoshi Ladies Clinic Reproductive Centre, 2-3-10 Aobadai, Aobaku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 227-0062, Japan.
4
Next Generation Science Institute, Morinaga Milk Industry Co., Ltd, 5-1-83 Higashihara, Zama, Kanagawa 252-8583, Japan.
5
Reproduction and Infertility Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8511, Japan.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keio University Graduate School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, -Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan.

Abstract

RESEARCH QUESTION:

Do gut microbiota associate with the ovulatory cycle in women showing normogonadotrophic anovulation? In humans, the gut microbiota affects diverse physiological functions and dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) may lead to pathological syndromes. However, there is comparatively little information on the relevance of gut microbiota to reproductive functions in women. Here, a group of women with idiopathic chronic anovulation were examined, who do not exhibit any apparent endocrinological disorder, as they are suitable for investigating the relationship between intestinal bacteria and ovulatory disorders.

DESIGN:

A prospective observational cohort study was performed on two groups of women who did not exhibit apparent endocrinological disorders but showed either irregular menstrual cycles (IMC group) or normal menstrual cycles (controls). The bacterial composition of faeces from rectal swabs from the women was analysed using next-generation sequencing based on bacterial 16SrRNA genes.

RESULTS:

A metagenomic analysis indicated that the two groups of women had significant differences in 28 bacterial taxa in their faeces. Prevotella-enriched microbiomes were more abundant in the IMC group, whereas Clostridiales, Ruminococcus and Lachnospiraceae (butyrate-producing bacteria) were present at lower levels in the IMC group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Distinctive subpopulations of intestinal microbiota were identified in women with unexplained chronic anovulation. The results indicate that gut microbiota could be associated with ovarian functions.

KEYWORDS:

Gut microbiota; Irregular menstrual cycle; Normogonadotrophic anovulation; Ovulatory disorders

PMID:
30773302
DOI:
10.1016/j.rbmo.2018.12.026
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