Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 May;120:64-67. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.02.019. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Radiologic recognition of cochlear implant magnet displacement.

Author information

1
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3231 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA. Electronic address: eppersmv@mail.uc.edu.
2
University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Medical Sciences Building Room 6507, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA. Electronic address: bornhl@ucmail.uc.edu.
3
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3231 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA; University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Medical Sciences Building Room 6507, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3026, USA. Electronic address: john.greinwald@cchmc.org.

Abstract

Despite various studies that have demonstrated risk of cochlear implant magnet displacement following MRI, minimal literature is available on radiologic recognition of magnet displacement. Current literature emphasizes the status and placement of the electrode component of the implant. This case report examines the consequences of a delay in radiologic diagnosis of a displaced magnet including hospital admission, unnecessary radiation, and prolonged patient discomfort. Additionally, it provides a framework for successful radiologic recognition of a displaced magnet, detailing specific imaging modalities and magnet characteristics that should be evaluated to expedite and facilitate radiologic recognition of displacement.

KEYWORDS:

CT; Cochlear implant; Displacement; MRI; Magnet; Radiology

PMID:
30771555
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center