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AIDS Behav. 2019 Feb 15. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02427-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of a Short Message Service (SMS) Intervention on Reduction of HIV Risk Behaviours and Improving HIV Testing Rates Among Populations located near Roadside Wellness Clinics: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

Author information

1
Health Economics and HIV and AIDS Research Division (HEARD), University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4th Floor J-Block, UKZN Westville Campus, Durban, 4001, South Africa.
2
Health Economics and HIV and AIDS Research Division (HEARD), University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4th Floor J-Block, UKZN Westville Campus, Durban, 4001, South Africa. Becketts@ukzn.ac.za.
3
Department of Archeology and Anthropology, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique.
4
Family AIDS Caring Trust (FACT), Mutare, Zimbabwe.
5
Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

Short Message Service (SMS) offers an innovative method of promoting sexual health to key and vulnerable populations who are users of mobile phones and are at high risk of HIV infection. This cluster randomised control trial tests the effectiveness of a SMS intervention in reducing HIV risk behaviours and improving HIV testing behaviours among truck drivers, sex workers and community residents located near Roadside Wellness Clinics (RWCs) in three southern African countries. The SMS arm received 35 HIV risk reduction and HIV testing SMSs over a 6-month period. The SMS intervention had no significant impact on sexual risk behaviours. However, participants in the SMS arm were more likely to have tested for HIV in the previous 6 months (86.1% vs. 77.7%; AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.11-2.66). The results indicate that the general SMS intervention, which provide health promoting information, improved HIV testing rates in key and vulnerable populations in southern Africa.

KEYWORDS:

HIV testing; Key populations; Mobile-health; Sexual risk behaviour

PMID:
30771133
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02427-6

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